Sunday, November 22, 2009

Canandaigua Botanical Society - a disclaimer

I was invited to many Canandaigua Botanical Society events by Maya Hobday since I first moved to Canandaigua in 1999. I enjoy the walks, the presentations, the meals, and the socializing with other folks I meet at the Botanical events, yet I was often uncomfortable getting to every event. At first, I found the wealth of information to be overwhelming and intimidating. Eventually I decided to not worry about learning EVERY bit of information that was shared by the presenter or other knowledgeable members. Instead, I just enjoy the gatherings of Botanical Society folk and try to hold onto just one or two bits of information that I find particularly helpful or interesting from each event. I now look forward to getting together with the Canandaigua Botanical Society. I always learn useful information about the botanical world around us and also enjoy getting to know a bit more about other Canandaigua Botanical Society members. There’s never been a “test” of knowledge learned at a Canandaigua Botanical Society event, yet there’s always a wealth of knowledge to gain. Please come join and enjoy us! Please also know that the notes written here on our Blog offer just a glimpse of what is shared and experienced at the actual Canandaigua Botanical Society events.
- Laura Ouimette

PLANTS WITH AN ATTITUDE IMAGES

I was able to gather a few carnivorous plant images from the internet...















From http://www.botany.org/carnivorous_plants/ the Butterwort, Bladderwort, and Venus Fly Trap

From http://www.naturephoto-cz.com/carnivorous-plants.html: the Sundew and Pitcher Plant








PLANTS WITH AN ATTITUDE

Canandaigua Botanical Society presentation
November 14, 2009

Dr. Bruce Gilman has been an Ontario County Botanist for the past 33 years. To many of the students at FLCC he is known as “THE PLANT MAN”.

The Plant Man speculated what might be considered plants with attitudes. Although prickly plants (honey locust), plants that harm us (poison ivy), and plants with an ego (ironwood/muscle wood) may indeed be plants with attitudes…Dr. Gilman focused his talk on carnivorous predatory plants.

The Plant Man (aka Dr. Gilman) discussed the classification, evolution, ecology, and feeding of Butterwort, Bladderwort, Sundew, Venus Fly Trap, and Pitcher Plant in our area of the world.

The Butterwort is rare and protected in NY State. It grows on rocky shores and ledges and can be found at Lethchworth State Park. The Butterwort, a perennial, has stalk leaves using a sticky flypaper like trap to collect insects and pollen grains.

Bladderwort is a free floating submersed plant with leaves underwater and a snapdragon like yellow flower in autumn. The submersed leaves have tiny bladders that suction up nutrients (water fleas) which stimulate hairs on the bladder. The closing of the trap doors can be heard as a crackling noise.

The Venus Fly Trap can be found along the coastal Carolinas. This plant uses a snap trap where two leaf jaws snap close creating a cage for the insect that stimulate two or more hairs on the outer edges of the leaves. The insect is then slowly digested by enzymes and absorbed by the leaf. A Venus Fly Trap leaf generally takes on three victims before it turns black and dies.

There are about 152 species of Sundew that can be found in temperate tropical bogs. The Sundew has glandular hairs which glisten like dew in the morning sun. It has stalked glands on the hairs coming off of the leaf. The digestive juices of the Sundew plant increase in production once its prey has been captured.

The Pitcher Plant is perhaps the most aggressive carnivorous plant using the scent of decaying meat and the color of blood red deep purple flowers to attract its prey. This plant has a hollow leaf with waxy surface and a pool of rain water used to drown its prey. The female Pitcher plant has an inverted umbrella where insects breed.

The Plant Man concluded the presentation with a short clip from the 1960’s movie, LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS where we giggled at the enormous plant gobbling up its prey of a floral shop robber.

PLANTS WITH AN ATTITUDE

Canandaigua Botanical Society presentation
November 14, 2009

Dr. Bruce Gilman has been an Ontario County Botanist for the past 33 years. To many of the students at FLCC he is known as “THE PLANT MAN”.

The Plant Man speculated what might be considered plants with attitudes. Although prickly plants (honey locust), plants that harm us (poison ivy), and plants with an ego (ironwood/muscle wood) may indeed be plants with attitudes…Dr. Gilman focused his talk on carnivorous predatory plants.

The Plant Man (aka Dr. Gilman) discussed the classification, evolution, ecology, and feeding of Butterwort, Bladderwort, Sundew, Venus Fly Trap, and Pitcher Plant in our area of the world.

The Butterwort is rare and protected in NY State. It grows on rocky shores and ledges and can be found at Lethchworth State Park. The Butterwort, a perennial, has stalk leaves using a sticky flypaper like trap to collect insects and pollen grains.

Bladderwort is a free floating submersed plant with leaves underwater and a snapdragon like yellow flower in autumn. The submersed leaves have tiny bladders that suction up nutrients (water fleas) which stimulate hairs on the bladder. The closing of the trap doors can be heard as a crackling noise.

The Venus Fly Trap can be found along the coastal Carolinas. This plant uses a snap trap where two leaf jaws snap close creating a cage for the insect that stimulate two or more hairs on the outer edges of the leaves. The insect is then slowly digested by enzymes and absorbed by the leaf. A Venus Fly Trap leaf generally takes on three victims before it turns black and dies.

There are about 152 species of Sundew that can be found in temperate tropical bogs. The Sundew has glandular hairs which glisten like dew in the morning sun. It has stalked glands on the hairs coming off of the leaf. The digestive juices of the Sundew plant increase in production once its prey has been captured.

The Pitcher Plant is perhaps the most aggressive carnivorous plant using the scent of decaying meat and the color of blood red deep purple flowers to attract its prey. This plant has a hollow leaf with waxy surface and a pool of rain water used to drown its prey. The female Pitcher plant has an inverted umbrella where insects breed.

The Plant Man concluded the presentation with a short clip from the 1960’s movie, LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS where we giggled at the enormous plant gobbling up its prey of a floral shop robber.

Plants With An Attitude attendance

The November 14th presentation presented by Dr. Bruce Gilman was attended by:

Renee Conde; Tom & Kathie Crocker; Robert, Caroline, Charlie & Philo Gray; Bob Guthrie; Maya Hobday; Peggy Kane; Dick Kent; Leona Lauster; Maureen Lynch; Lauralee & John Maas; Jim Miller; Laura, Bethan & Thomas Ouimette; John & Mary Purdy; Judy Robinson.

Thanks to John and Mary Purdy for providing refreshments!

Saturday, November 14, 2009

Thanks to the Daily Messenger!

24 people attended the Canandaigua Botanical Society presentation by THE PLANT MAN. Thanks to the Daily Messenger for the following article running in Friday's paper:

Daily Messenger Friday, November 13, 2009

WEEKEND
WATCH:
Carnivorous
plants 101
and more
Messenger Post
You can’t say there’s nothing
to do this weekend. Holiday
bazaar season is in full
swing. There’s Christmas
shopping to start, holiday
decorations to put up, and
yep, leaves left to rake. Not in
the mood for any of those?
How about spending some
time learning about carnivorous
plants at Finger Lakes
Community College. For that
and other events, read on.
Hungry plants
Learn about the intriguing
adaptations of carnivorous
plants in our region at a lecture
by Bruce Gilman, professor
of environmental
conservation and horticulture
at Finger Lakes Community
College and the director of
the Muller Field Station. The
talk will take place at 10 a.m.
Saturday in Room C-220 at
FLCC, which is on Marvin
Sands Drive (off Lakeshore
Drive) in Hopewell. It is free to
attend.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

PLANTS WITH AN ATTITUDE

Indoor meeting at Finger Lakes Community College
10 am on Saturday, November 14, 2009
Room C220 at FLCC (facing the front of the college, C220 is to the far left of the campus, up a short drive).

Join Dr. Bruce Gilman, Professor of Environmental Conservation & Horticulture and Director of Muller Field Station, for one of his ever entertaining and super-informative slide shows. Dr. Gilman will describe the intriguing adaptations of carnivorous plants in our region. Bring your sense of humor and be prepared for a lot of learning!

Saturday, August 29, 2009

This is a photo Laura Ouimette took at Robert H. Treman park earlier this summer. We saw loads of mushrooms and fungi that trip. Like the Lagoon Park in Canandaigua, dogs were restricted in some areas.

LAGOON PARK PLANT LIST

August 22, 2009
Leader: Bob Guthrie

(Page numbers are from Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide by Lawrence Newcomb.)

Water Horehound p 90
Spotted Touch-me-not or Jewelweed p 54
Canada Goldenrod p 448
Grass-leaved Goldenrod p 450
Red-Osier Dogwood p 166
Bulb-bearing Water Hemlock p 222
Staghorn Sumac p 320
Canada Thistle p 430
Common Arrowhead p 118
St. Johnswort p 268
Common Hawkweed p 372
White Sweet Clover p 60
Teasel p 160
Queen Anne’s Lace p 220
Dogbane or Indian Hemp p 250
Downy Willow Herb p 156
Hedge Bindweed p 324
Common Reed or Phragmites australis
Common Buckthorn p 168
Spotted Knapweed p 234
Blue Vervain p 282
Great Burdock p 412
Poison Ivy p 330
Highbush Cranberry p. 304
Swamp Smartweed p 192
Swamp Milkweed p 262
Evening Primrose p 134
Chickweed p 274
Birdsfoot Trefoil p 66
Panicled or Gray Dogwood p 166
Bittersweet Nightshade p 328
Brown Knapweed p 210
Common Milkweed p 264
Purple Loosestrife p 351
Curled Dock p 404
Common Mullein p 188
Butter-and-eggs p 48
Field Scabious p 84
Common and English Plantain p 398
Heal-all or Selfheal p 78
Prairie Rose p 318
Calico Aster p 456
Sweet-scented Water Lily p 358 called Fragrant Water-lily in Peterson Guide
Bedstraw
New England Aster p 460
Common Comfry p 188
Elecampane p 376
Boneset p 434
Sweet Pea
Arrow-leaved Aster p 454

THANKS to Leona Lauster for recording this list!

If anyone has photos to share please Email them to Laura Ouimette.

Friday, August 21, 2009

LAGOON WALK - AUGUST 22nd.

Just a reminder that there will be a Lagoon Walk on Saturday, August 22nd beginning at 10 am.
Meet at the parking lot of the Steamboat Landing on Lakeshore Drive in Canandaigua.

Laura Ouimette will not be attending but will welcome species lists and photos to post here. Send Emails to Canandaiguabotanical@Gmail.com.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

LAGOON WALK - AUGUST 22, 2009

Time: 10 am
Leader: Bob Guthrie
Meet at the Steamboat Landing parking lot on Lakeshore Drive in Canandaigua.

The warm days of summer and many native plants and trees in the Lagoon Park should be good news for caterpillars and butterflies. We'll check out the territory along the easy walk and well-groomed pathways. With abundance of wetlands, mud puddles, nectar, and weeds, we should have lots to see.

Sunday, July 19, 2009

July 11th Photos


At the Experiment Station

Many species are marked!

Three Ginko trees: male-female-male

Spiderwort

Beebalm

At Dr. Lamboy's Gardens

Sweet pea

Black Alder - new and old seeds

Identifying MANY species



A pear variety

Habitats created by Dr. Lamboy

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Minutes from our July 11, 2009 field trip

Attending the walk at the Geneva Experiment Station and then at Dr. Jana Lamboy's gardens on Saturday, July 11, 2009: Ray Boda, Bob Guthrie, Maya Hobday, John Hyde, Dr. Jana Lamboy, Leona Lauster, Laura Ouimette with Bethan and Thomas, Nan Seyfried, and Elizabeth Socci. Species recorders: Maya and Leona
Stormy weather, but we managed to stay dry.
.
Dr. Lamboy shared with us: A GUIDE TO THE WOODY ORNAMENTALS OF THE NYS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, GENEVA NY Produced by the Geneva Arboretum Association for Arbor Day April 24, 1992.
.
Geneva Experiment Station:Pachysandra, Yucca, Mugo Pine, Helleborine, Swamp White Oak, Paper Birch, Ginkgo, White Cedar, Washington Hawthorn, Turkish Filbert (quite large), Sugar Maple, Katsura, European Hornbeam, Cedar Hawthorn Rust, Star Magnolia (& magnolia scale), Native Perennials:Spiderwort, Tickseed, Wild Bergamot, Bee Balm, Joe-Pye Weed (many colors and sizes), Black-eyed Susan, New England Aster, Bleeding Heart, Plantain
Sundrops, Coral Bells, Whirling Butterflies, Creeping Phlox, Butterflyweed, New Jersey Tea, Milkweed (different colors and sizes), Climbing Hydrangea (near wall on driveway), Rose bush (small, very delicate yellow flowers), Liatol blazing star (?)
At Jana Lamboy’s Gardens:Norway Spruce, Phlox, White Aster, Blue Vervain, New Jersey Tea, Dahlias, Blue Lobelia, Mountain Mint, Peppermint, Lisyanthus, Sunflowers, Nigella, Rattlesnake Master, Chestnut, American Elm, Perennial Poppy, Coreopsis, Baby’s Breath, Northern Sea Oats, Rubeccia, Ecinachia, Annual Poppy, Penstamin, Yarrow “the pearl” or Pearl Yarrow, Strawflowers, St. Johnswort, Globe Thistle, Japanese Umbrella Pine (very long needles), White Birch, Pink Yarrow, Black Alder, Carolina Silverbell, Bur Oak (raised from a seed 12-15 yrs ago), Sweetshrub, Mountain Ash, Turkish Filbert, Swamp Milkweed, Obedient Plant, Bald Cypress, Elderberry, Statice, Anemone, Foamflower, Columbine, Lamb’s ear, Bee Balm (different sizes, leaves, and colors), Lilies, Pear tree (where small pears hang down like a bunch of grapes)

Monday, June 29, 2009

UPCOMING EVENT

Field trip to the Geneva Experiment Station
Saturday, July 11, 2009

Time: 10 am.
OR if carpooling; 9:30 am at the County Court House parking lot.
Meet in the parking lot at the water tower near Jordan Hall off of W. North St. in Geneva. From Canandaigua, take Routes 5 & 20 east, turn left onto Preemption Rd. and turn right onto W. North St. Look for the water tower.

The Experiment Station is closed on the weekends. However, we can tour their native herbaceous flower gardens and have lunch in the gazebo on the Station grounds. Dr. Jana Lamboy, Assistant Professor of Environmental Conservation and Horticulture at FLCC has offered to give us a tour of the gardens which should be in full flower. After lunch, we will go to see Dr. Lamboy's gardens - natural, permaculture gardens. The emphasis is on cut flowers, privacy, natives, shrubs and trees without the use of pesticides or fertilizers.

Photos from our June 27th FLCC Woods walk with Dr. Bruce Gilman

Under a London Planetree
Bruce with Tulip tree
Weeping Spruce
Austrian Pine (male and female)
White Ash
Mock Orange
Male Ebony Jewelwing damselfly (holds wings back at rest)
Ebony Jewelwing damselfly - female (note the white dot)
***Thanks to Leona for the clarification about the difference between
Dragonflies (hold wings straight out at rest) and Damselflies.***

Poison Ivy
Corkscrew Willow
Blue Cohosh
Black Walnut
Along the boardwalk
White Baneberry (Doll's eyes) in bloom
Enjoying the Herb Garden

Canandaigua Botanical Meeting Minutes from Lincoln Woods walk at FLCC, June 27, 2009

Led by Dr. Bruce Gilman

Attending: Dr. Bruce Gilman, Bob Guthrie, Mark Hawkins, Maya Hobday, John Hyde, Dick Kent, Leona Lauster, Laura Ouimette & Thomas, Mary and John Purdy, Elizabeth Socci,

Species recorders: Leona Lauster and Maya Hobday
Beautiful morning, pleasantly warm after some rainy days.

In the Arboretum: Started by Bruce Gilman in 1977
Little Leaf Linden; White Mulberry; Norway Maple; Red Maple; London Planetree; Sugar Maple; Pin Oak -deep sinuses, sharp points; Black Oak; Coranga Hedge (carnings tree forming hedges); Gold-tipped Cedar; Native white cedar; Thuja; Juniper; Deadly Nightshade in bloom; Catnip; Tall Hedge; Red Beech, Purple Beech; Native Magnolia or Cucumber Tree; Hackberry tree; Tulip Tree (Bruce’s favorite); Ginkgo-male; Scarlet Pimpernel; Austrian Pine -male & female on one tree; Weeping Norway Spruce-weeping pine; White Pine; Dawn Redwood-cone; Colorado Blue Spruce; Bald Cyprus; Fir tree – white stripes underneath needle; European Larch tree – looses needles;

Then the woods and Fallbrook trail:
Black Walnut; White Ash – seeds hang down like a grape pod; Private Hedge (pivot hedge escape); Buckthorn; Boxelder; European Wayfarer; Redbud; Cottonwood tree; Mock Orange shrub – white blossoms; Thimbleweed or Anemone – in bloom, seed head resembles a thimble; Native Sycamore; Willow; European Viburium; Hog Peanut; Orange-fruited Horse Gentian (genus triosterum); American Elm – lives only about 20 years; Rough Hawkweed – yellow; Field Garlic/Meadow Garlic; Poison Ivy; Smooth Sumac; Honeysuckle; Birdsfoot Trefoil; Crown Vetch; Common Mugwort; Corkscrew Willow –doesn’t grow tall therefore ideal for small yards (John Hyde), also used in floral arrangements; Autumn Olive; Canada Thistle; Butter-and-eggs; Blue-stemmed Goldenrod; Poplar tree; Sugar Maple; Mayapple in fruit; White Baneberry; False Solomon’s Seal; Red Oak; White Oak; Spicebush; Touch-me-not; Enchanter’s Nightshade; Clearweed

Then the boardwalk and trail:
Skunk Cabbage – red ashes; Marsh Marigold; Water Horehound; Red Ash; Yellow Iris; Swamp Dock; Yellow Water Buttercup – small, introduced to swamp by Bruce; Winterberry Holly

After the boardwalk:
Oxeye Daisy; Red Mulberry; Wild Geranium; Helleborine- weed Orchid; Garlic Mustard;
Blue Cohosh; Barberry; Bloodroot; Doll’s Eyes, White Baneberry in bloom

Herb Garden:
Tansy; Spiderwort; Ostrich Fern; Fern-leaf Tansy; Parsley; Foxglove; Yarrow – yellow; Nasturtium; Santalina; Lamb’s Ear; Horehound; Valerian; Sedum, Autumn Joy; Japanese Scholar Tree; Smoke Bush; Columbine aquilegia; Cultivated foam flower & Delphinium;

Paperbark Maple – hoping for a successful transplant this year
Day Lily; Coffee Tree;

Friday, June 12, 2009

UPCOMING EVENT

THE WOODS AT FINGER LAKES COMMUNITY COLLEGE IN SPRINGTIME

SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 2009 : 10 am

Meet at FLCC parking lot across from the Arboretum entrance.

Let's hope there's sunshine and warm weather for this walk, but if not, there's still plenty to see and experience in the woods across from the FLCC main buildings. We'll see June wildflowers amongst the forest floor and hopefully, catch a migrating bird or two. We'll view forest habitats, follow a boardwalk over a pond, and view grassy areas - all with their own ecosystems. Bring binoculars and camera; also bug spray. Trails are level but could be muddy so wear boots and bring a walking stick.

Dr. Bruce Gilman, Professor of Environmental Conservation and Horticulture and Mullen Field Station Director, will lead the walk.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Lagoon Park Photos

I've tried to label photos to the right or underneath. A species list for our Lagoon Park walk follows.




Yellow flag/iris









Common Reed


Milkweed and Daisy


Locust in bloom

Birdsfoot Trefoil

Bindweed


Sumac


Daisy Fleabane

Red-Osier Dogwood

Rose


Bittersweet Nightshade in bloom and trefoil (?)

Flax in bloom, bright blue

Looking through "frog spit" (also known as "coo-coo spit")





. Ray finds egg shell and the snail that "walked" with us.
A Beaver lodge and evidence of beaver's work