Thursday, March 27, 2014

ANNUAL POTLUCK, PRESENTATION, & MEETING

FRIDAY, April 25, 2014 at 6:00 PM

CELEBRATING SEED in the NORTHEAST

 with Petra Page-Mann  (Fruition Seeds)

This is our annual Potluck dinner and presentation followed by a brief annual meeting.  We meet at Saint John's Episcopal Church, 183 North Main Street, Canandaigua - downstairs in the Parish Hall - enter through Saint John's Court off Howell Street. The dinner will begin at 6 PM and the presentation will begin at 7 PM.

Invite friends! Please bring a dish to pass and your own table service.  Coffee will be provided.  Bring cash or check to pay your annual dues ($7 individual; $10 family) and receive the 2014-15 Canandaigua Botanical Society printed program.
 
Here's what we have to look forward to as we celebrate our 140th year:

       Daffodils at Marty Dodge’s

       Spring Wild Flowers at Pal Mac

       Bird Walk on Ontario Pathways

       Fellenz Family Farm tour, Phelps

       Unique Spring Gardens of Michael Hannen, Rochester

       Maya Hobday bench dedication at FLCC Arboretum

       Tour of Lagoon Park Restoration    

       Wild Edibles at Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary

       Zurich Bog Walk

       Ganondagan Medicinal Plant Walk

       George Eastman House Gardens Tour

       Canandaigua Main Streetscape Tour

       Wetland plants and soils at Muller Field Station

       Wegmans Organic Farm tour

       Mushroom Walk at Onanda Park

       Botanical T-shirt printing

       Ontario Pathways Walk from Gifford Road

       Canandaigua Botanical Society Herbarium

       Tree Identification indoor meeting

       Potluck dinner and Frozen Lake Presentation

       Canandaigua City Arbor Day tree planting


We will also have information about other organizations and areas of botanical interest listed in this year's printed program.

Thursday, March 6, 2014

FINGER LAKES LAND TRUST: Indoor meeting

SATURDAY, March 22, 2014 at 10:00 AM

INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVITIES OF 

THE FINGER LAKES LAND TRUST


The Finger Lakes Land Trust is committed to protecting lake shores, streams, wetlands, and other sensitive lands surrounding the Finger Lakes.  They also provide educational outreach to Finger lakes landowners and municipalities.  The land trust aims to preserve Finger Lakes lands for future generations to enjoy.  Elizabeth Newbold, Land Protection Specialist of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, will provide an overview of their many projects and success stories.  More information can be found at their website: www.fllt.org.

Minutes from our meeting on March 22, 2014 with Elizabeth Newbold:

The Finger Lakes Land Trust was founded in 1989 to protect those lands that define the character of the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. To date, the Land Trust has protected more than 16,000 acres of the region's wetlands, forests, farmland, shorelines, and gorges. This has been accomplished through the establishment of nature preserves that are open to the public for quiet recreation, the use of conservation easements (voluntary agreements on private lands), and the provision of technical assistance and educational programs to local governments, landowners, and the public. The Land Trust is a nonprofit organization supported primarily by membership donations and grants from private foundations.

On March 22nd 2014 Elizabeth Newbold, Land Protection Specialist of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, provided an overview of the Finger Lakes Land Trust to a dozen members of the Canandaigua Botanical Society at Finger Lakes Community College. The Finger Lakes Land Trust encompasses eleven Finger Lakes and twelve counties.  Essentially, the Finger Lakes Land Trust works with people who want to protect their land into the future. 

Elizabeth focused her discussion on the Canandaigua Lake Watershed.  The FLLT recently published this Canandaigua report: http://www.fllt.org/linkfiles/cndgareport.pdf which has several of the photos and information Elizabeth shared.

Elizabeth shared information about the local Finger Lakes Land Trust properties:

    Once privately owned, now owned by Naples and open to the public with a new bridge built by Ontario County.  There will soon be a video on Youtube made from a remote controlled plane with a camera that navigates through Grimes Glen. 

   This preserve off Gulick Road in Naples features several gullies including a portion of the immense Briggs Gully as well as mature forest, beautiful wildflowers and sweeping views of the hills surrounding Honeoye Lake's southern end.

   This park on County Road 12 with a scenic overlook of Canandaigua Lake is the result of collaboration between Odell Scott, FLLT, and the Town of South Bristol. 

    With more than 250 acres, Great Hill Preserve has trails along the forested slopes high above Canandaigua Lake and next to Hi Tor Wildlife Management Area. Nundawao (Great Hill, in English) is revered by the Senecas as the birthplace of the Seneca people.

Elizabeth also talked about:
     The Armstrong acquisition on South Hill near the Great Hill Nature Preserve and High Tor Wildlife Management Area: http://www.fllt.org/news/index.php?id=125
      The grassland habitat restoration near High Tor Wildlife Management Area on page 3 of the FLLT Autumn 2013 newsletter http://www.fllt.org/getres.php?id=428
     And the Reed acquisition along the shore of Canandaigua Lake up to Bare Hill highlighted in the FLLT Summer 2013 newsletter http://www.fllt.org/getres.php?id=427

What can we do?  Volunteer, make a donation, notify FLLT about properties for sale, attend an event, and enjoy the FLLT properties.  

More information can be found at their website: www.fllt.org.


Thursday, February 27, 2014

Area CSA Fairs

Are you interested in Community Supported Agriculture?  
These two fairs will have information to help you decide what CSA might be best for you:

Saturday, March 8    1-3:00pm
Brickstone - Wintergarden
1325 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester
sponsored by MVP Health

Tuesday, March 18    6-8:00pm 
Palmyra Community Library, 
402 East Main St., Palmyra
sponsored by the Palmyra Community Library

The Fellenz Family Farm will be at both CSA fairs:
http://fellenzfamilyfarm.com/

Saturday, February 8, 2014

HELP US BRAINSTORM IDEAS

We are pulling together the 2014-2015 program.  If you have ideas about what field trips or speakers you might be interested in PLEASE LET US KNOW! Perhaps you may even want to lead an event yourself?!?!  You can contact us at canandaiguabotanical@gmail.com.

Might this interest you, or young friends you know?

In attempts to brainstorm ideas for our 2014-15 programs, I found these events hosted by the Seneca Meadows Landfill:  http://www.senecameadows.com/events.php?cat=Family

Snowshoe Tracking Hike

Saturday, February 22nd, 2014 (11:00 AM-12:30 PM)

Location: Seneca Meadows Wetlands PreserveStrap on your sense of adventure and join us for an amazing snowshoe hike as we look for animal tracks in the snow! (Snowshoes provided.) Call to register 315-539-5624.
Location: Seneca Meadows Wetlands Preserve, Black Brook Road, Seneca Falls
Date: Saturday, February 22nd, 11:00 am—12:30 pm
Cost: FREE
Program Type: Family

Owl Pellet Pandemonium

Saturday, March 22nd, 2014 (2:00 PM - 3:30 PM)

Location: Seneca Meadows Education Center
Kids love dissecting owl pellets! The pellets contain items the owl cannot digest, and they tell us a lot about an owl’s life. It’s pretty cool stuff! Come join the fun! Call to register 315-539-5624.
Location: Seneca Meadows Education Center, 1977 State Route 414, Seneca Falls
Date: Saturday, March 22nd, 2:00—3:30 pm
Cost: FREE
Program Type: Family


Macroinvertebrate Mayhem

Saturday, May 24th, 2014 (11:30 AM - 12:30 PM)

Location: Seneca Meadows Wetlands Preserve
If your kids like to catch frogs and other slimy creatures, you won’t want to miss this! Come join the fun as we meet the many spineless creatures of the Seneca Meadows Wetlands Preserve! Call to register 315-539-5624.
Location: Seneca Meadows Wetlands Preserve, Black Brook Road, Seneca Falls
Date: Saturday, May 24th, 11:30 am—12:30 pm
Cost: FREE
Program Type: Family

Friday, January 24, 2014

Canandaigua Botanical Society Celebrates 140 Years in 2014

Did you know that the Canandaigua Botanical Society celebrates its 140th birthday this year?  Thanks to avid botanists in 1874 who were interested in studying all types of plants in the Finger Lakes area, the Canandaigua Botanical Society was established and has become the second oldest botanical club in the United States. 

We will soon be pulling together the 2014-2015 program.  If you have ideas about what field trips or speakers you might be interested in PLEASE LET US KNOW!  You can contact us at canandaiguabotanical@gmail.com.

Our two remaining events for the 2013-14 program include:


SATURDAY, March 22, 2014 at 10:00 AM
INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVITIES OF THE FINGER LAKES LAND TRUST
  This is an indoor meeting at FLCC Room C220. (directions to FLCC room C220)
The Finger Lakes Land Trust is committed to protecting lake shores, streams, wetlands, and other sensitive lands surrounding the Finger Lakes.  They also provide educational outreach to Finger lakes landowners and municipalities.  The land trust aims to preserve Finger Lakes lands for future generations to enjoy.  Andy Zepp, Executive Director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust, will provide an overview of their many projects and success stories.  More information can be found at their website: www.fllt.org

FRIDAY, April 25, 2014 at 6:00 PM
ANNUAL MEETING AND PRESENTATION: CELEBRATING SEED in the NORTHEAST with Petra Page-Mann  (Fruition Seeds)
 This is our annual Potluck dinner and presentation followed by a brief annual meeting.  We meet at Saint John's Episcopal Church, 183 North Main Street, Canandaigua - downstairs in the Parish Hall - enter through Saint John's Court off Howell Street. The dinner will begin at 6 PM and the presentation will begin at 7 PM.
 Bring a dish to pass, your own table service and a guest or two if you wish.  Bring cash or check to pay your annual dues ($7 individual; $10 family) and receive the 2014-15 Canandaigua Botanical Society printed program.



Sunday, November 24, 2013

NATIVE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION


November 9, 2013 at FLCC

Ben Zimmerman, Construction Manager and Restoration Ecologist of Applied Ecological Services, Inc. spoke to an audience of 20 about what it takes to recreate a diverse, functional native ecosystem.  Ben, a Wisconsin native and Stevens Point graduate, shared an informative power point presentation from which I took the following notes:

Ben introduced the three components of Applied Ecological Services as Consulting, Contracting, and Nursery.

Consulting includes components of Landscape Design, Ecological Assessment, Permitting, GIS, High Resolution Multi Spectrum Imaging, and Engineering.

The Nursery services cover 300 acres of land in Wisconsin focusing on over 400 species of native plants for local genotypes.  Native plants can become costly as they can be difficult to come by and difficult to clean.  Native seed is often measured by ounce instead of pound.  Seeds are collected from private and public land.  For the project at Seneca Meadows Wetlands Preserve many seeds were collected in 2007 from Montezuma.  Many of the seeds needed to be collected in narrow windows of time after keeping a careful watch on weather conditions. Ben explained that obtaining seeds from private land owners becomes a great public education service as awareness of property values and the diversity of species is explained.

There is an excellent video about the Taylor Creek Restoration Nurseries on the front page of the AES website:  http://www.appliedeco.com/

Ben then focused much of the presentation on Contracting which covers: design-build, bioengineering, eco-construction, seeding, planting, erosion control, woodland brushing (invasive species removal), ecological management and maintenance.

The WHY of Ecological Restoration includes: biological diversity, wildlife habitat, water quality, air quality, soil building, carbon sequestration, educational, stewardship, sustainability, and aesthetics.

Projects come from: mitigation and wetland banking, remediation, habitat improvement, permit renewal, conservation development, green infrastructure, native landscaping, and invasive species.

Mitigation: 
·        Compensation for ‘unavoidable’ environmental impact…usually wetland impact.
·        Involves a calculated acreage ratio dependant on the nature of the impact.
·        If approached properly, can have positive outcomes.
·        Requires permitting from the state USACE (US Army Corp of Engineers)
                                    Replacing what is destroyed.

Wetlands
·        US has lost over 50% of our wetlands
·        Clean Water Act regulated by NYSDEC
·        USACE permits mitigation
·        Contamination – superfund sites, EPA – drives remediation
·        Disruption – dams agriculture management


Ben spoke specifically about the Seneca Meadows Inc. Dove Property Wetland Mitigation in Waterloo, NY and showed areal photographs from 2005, 2009, and 2011.  We heard about the forested wetlands, emergent marsh, wet mesic, and oak savanna prairie.  Ben had photos of the earth movers that were needed to give the flat farm lands some topography in 2008.  (He also showed us other “cool toys” like land tamers and amphibian vehicles.)  During the project, Indiana Bats were found to be present and project course needed to change to preserve trees to be protective habitat for the bats.  This resulted in several tree islands within the marsh. The installation phase included 420 acres of seeding, 10,000 trees and shrubs, and 164,000 plant plugs.

The SMI Dove Property is currently in the Management Phase (2011-2022) where controlled burns, backpack sprayers, and plows will be used to physically manage the project. 

Goals of Management:
·        Restore a functional native ecosystem
·        Recreate biological community that historically existed
·        Stabilize soils
·        Remove invasive species
·        Enhance existing ecosystems
·        Ultimately meet performance standards of permit for percentage of native and invasive plant species coverage

Monitoring:
·        woody and herbaceous
·        vegetation survey
·        reptile and amphibian survey
·        bird survey
·        fish survey
·        wetland delineation
·        water quality survey
·        hydrology monitoring
·        macro invertebrate survey

Our word of the day comes from hydrology monitoring with a tool called a piezometer: an instrument for measuring pressure or compressibility; especially one for measuring the change of pressure of a material subjected to hydrostatic pressure.  We saw a photo of a piezometer made with PVC pipe with tiny holes.  They are covered by black material – should you happen to notice any during your next walk through the Seneca Meadow Wetland Preserve.

Post AES Management: Audubon, NY will become the site stewards after AES completes their project.  SMI has set up an endowment fund that will provide a management budget for Audubon (which already has an educational center nearby). 

Ben told us about the SMI Black Brook Relocation/Cleaning projects which combined with the Dove Property (Seneca Meadows Wetland Preserve) cover nearly 1000 acres.

Ben finished with an overview of a habitat improvement project in Grand Island, NY near the Niagara River called Little Beaver Island. 

For more about Seneca Meadows:
http://www.senecameadows.com/wetlands.php